Spain

Seville’s Alcázar

If I were ever to build a palace, I hope it would look something like Seville’s Alcázar. This place is truly a work of art. It is one of the few places we’ve been to that has changed hands from Muslim to Christian rulers and still retains much of its original continuity and beauty.

We spent nearly a full day here wandering through the halls, taking our breaks in the vast gardens before continuing to gape at all there was to see here. There are no doubt many stories to be told about the people who lived here, but none of them seem to have survived. The architecture itself seems to outshine any other human drama.

You’ll no doubt surmise from the pictures that this architecture is Moorish in design. Folks, this is what happens when you apply the full genius of human creativity to a task in which carving human likenesses is forbidden. Behold what a few artistic boundaries can do:

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Detail on the exterior of the palace. Photo © 2017 Ryan Haskett.
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The Hall of Ambassadors. Photo © 2017 Tricia Griffin.
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Ceiling of the Hall of Ambassadors. Photo © 2017 Ryan Haskett.
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Arched doorways. Photo © 2017 Tricia Griffin.
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Arches leading to the bedrooms. Photo © 2017 Ryan Haskett.
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One small slice of the gardens. There is a hydraulic fountain here that plays an organ once an hour. Photo © 2017 Tricia Griffin.
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Super fun hedge maze. Photo © 2017 Tricia Griffin.

This is a must see if you’re coming to Seville. Every single room is a delight. It’s right across from the cathedral, but do not – I repeat, do not – see both the Alcázar and the cathedral on the same day. It’s too much.

1 thought on “Seville’s Alcázar”

  1. When I returned home from my visit there I tried to create a stone step in my garden like one of the black and white in the courtyard. Needless to say, I failed miserably, but it was certainly an exercise that elevated my appreciation for the artisans of the Alcazar.

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